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Another address, signed by eight hundred and thirty-three residents, was presented to Governor Bligh, expressive of their confidence in his administration in the year 1808. The old denominational school system came to an end by the erection and opening: of the present Public School in 1870. However, it is known that Governor King gave him forty gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27th, 1806. It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. Again, we find in 1800 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. vii., page 225.) He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker Street and in Bridge Street, Windsor.

Governor Bligh, and his son-in-law, Captain Putland, had farms near Pitt Town, where Bligh's oaks may still be seen. From this it appears that he obtained four hundred gallons of spirits which he retailed at a profit of twelve hundred pounds. His town residence in Sydney was in Macquarie Place. At another meeting to consider local grievances, John Bowman, Matthew Gibbons, and William Cummins were also present. Evans, William Baker, Thomas Arndell, Samuel Solomon and Andrew Thompson.

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The 73rd Regiment was stationed here in large barracks built about the year 1820, and still standing in Bridge Street. The main history of this period will be found elsewhere, in such articles as "The Hospital", "Churches", "Magistrates", "Early Schools", "Military", and specially in the separate articles dealing with the following pioneers:—Andrew Thompson, Richard Fitzgerald, Dr. These were well built, for four, if not five, Macquarie buildings are still in use—St. This was originally built of brick for a granary, one hundred and one feet by twenty-five feet, and twenty-three feet high, with three floors, and was completed in August, 1803. Thomas Riccaby died on the 15th May, 1818, aged 67 years. "Nor can we close this tribute to his memory without recurring to the important services Mr. From respect and esteem for the Memory of the deceased, this Monument is erected by LACHLAN MACQUARIE, GOVERNOR of New South Wales [A. The words in brackets appear in a copy of the inscription which was made about 1820, and is now in the Public Records' Office, London.

At first the soldiers' and prisoners' barracks were in Thompson Square, near the Windsor wharf. Matthew's Church and rector, and the Court House being the best examples. The present gaol was built on the same site in 1859. Thompson's executors, and made into a hospital and grounds for fifty patients. This farm, part of which was formerly known as Catherine Farm, extended from the eastern boundary of the Presbyterian Church to a point near Fitzgerald Street, and included New Street, Catherine Street, Church Street, and Windsor Terrace. Thompson rendered this colony and many of his fellow creatures during the heavy and public distresses which the floods at the Hawkesbury produced among the settlers in that extensive district. Thompson's exertions on a late occasion were for two days and two nights unremittingly directed to the assistance of the sufferers, and we lament to add that in those offices of humanity he not only exposed himself to personal danger, but laid the foundation for that illness which has deprived the world of a valuable life. Before closing this sketch of Andrew Thompson we must mention that he had some bitter enemies in Sydney, though none locally, who painted him in a very different colour. Andrew's College, was next called and settled, in 1896, and he worked with great energy, having the church thoroughly renovated and repaired at considerable expense in 1897.

Another object of these grain depots was to better control the price of grain, as in times of scarcity the local farmers charged most exorbitant prices, and also tried to prevent importation. On the arrival of Governor Macquarie's successor, Sir Thomas Brisbane, he called for a report on the public buildings of the colony. The milk returns sent by Andrew Thompson to him amounted to £60 0s. In the performance of this heroic work his health was seriously undermined. The foundation stone of a brick chapel, thirty-two feet by sixteen feet, was laid by the Rev.

The first era of the history of Green Hills ends here, and the second stage in its history as Windsor begins. Extract from Government and General Order, dated 15th December, 1810, issued on the return of his Excellency Governor Macquarie from an extensive tour of inspection through the various districts where agriculture and the breeding of cattle have occupied the attention of settlers. We have quoted from this report, which was made in 1824, in the articles dealing with the Hospital, St. This is a fitting place to insert some further particulars as to the expenditure and the condition of certain other Windsor buildings:— Extracts from report of the value of the improvements which have taken place in the Public Buildings of Sydney, Parramatta, Windsor, Liverpool, and Campbelltown, from December 25th, 1822, to December 24th, 1823, and an expose of the present state of Public Buildings in New South Wales, by order of his Excellency Sir Thomas Brisbane, made by S. Harris, Architect, in 1824:— "Commissariat Offices, etc.—The office is a shed adjoining the end of the store, about eighty feet long, with two storeys." "The School Room, Old Hospital, Store, and Dr. Andrew Thompson also had a large store-keeping business at the Green Hills (Windsor), which, according to an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette, was taken over by Mr.

It was really the growth of grain, wheat and maize that led Governor Macquarie to lay out, among others, the town of Windsor, in order to preserve the produce being lost by inundations after it had been harvested. This petition was signed by one hundred and fifty-six persons, among whom were Messrs. Arndell, Thomas Hobby, Andrew Thompson, George Crossley, John Dight, C. His son-in-law, Captain Putland, also had land adjoining. Methodist Church, formerly known as the Wesley an Church, has a very long and interesting history in Windsor.

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